Internet Explorer Is No More, and It Won’t Be Coming Back

Internet Explorer Is No More, and It Won't Be Coming Back

RIP Internet Explorer — It’s Gone For Good Now

(TargetLiberty.org) – For years, millions of people have used Internet Explorer to surf the web. Then better browsers, like Google Chrome and Firefox, came along, causing people to lose interest in the once-popular Explorer. Eventually, many people only clicked on the blue “e” with its yellow band when they wanted to download a new, faster browser.

In 2021, Microsoft signaled it had received the memo from internet users and announced it was ending Internet Explorer’s life the following year. Now, the time has come to bid farewell to an old friend.

Adios, Little Explorer

On June 15, Microsoft put Internet Explorer in the trashcan and permanently deleted it. Never again will internet users click on the little icon to download their favorite browser while screeching about how slow it is.

Microsoft used Internet Explorer for decades. Beginning in 1995, it was to go-to for all of its computers. In fact, between 1995 and 2013, the company developed 11 different versions of the browser. For years, it was popular with Internet users, but it aged poorly.

Beginning in the early 2010s, techies began complaining about how badly Internet Explorer functioned. A quick search of Google shows article after article about why the browser “sucks.” Often people complained it was slow and didn’t work correctly. It came to a point where Microsoft knew it needed to make a change.

Microsoft Edge

The company has decided to use its Edge browser exclusively. The Edge browser icon is reminiscent of Internet Explorer, resembling a wave that looks like it’s in the shape of an “e.”

The Edge browser was originally launched in 2015. The company had already switched over to it and installed it on many of its new computers. According to the company, users can “still access older, legacy sites that require Internet Explorer,” but they will have to use Internet Explorer mode to access it.

In its 2021 announcement about Edge, Microsoft claimed the new browser is “faster, more secure and more modern,” than its predecessor. The statement went on to say that “change was necessary,” but it wanted to make sure the old websites would still work, which is why the company developed the Internet Explorer mode.

Microsoft also stated that Edge would make it easier for those who need to have public websites and internal workplace apps open at the same time. To help users navigate the internet better, the company claims its “dual-engine advantage streamlines” productivity. Users can also use a new feature called “sleeping tabs,” which allows tabs to remain open but frees up system resources to prevent crashes.

Do you intend to use the new Microsoft browser?

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